Friday 15. December 2017

Get inspired

 


Migration & Asylum
a welcoming Europe?



our roots:
CHRISTIAN SOCIAL THINKING
  • Prof. Regina Polak

     

    Migration as a “Sign of the Times”


    The Catholic Church considers migration to be a “sign of the times” (EM 14). Migration invites us to construct together a renewed humanity. For believers, migration is an instrument of the history of salvation. Migration is an opportunity to learn about justice and to put into practice a diverse humanity that lives together, and thereby to experience the grace of God.

     

    The Christian faith owes its history to this way of looking on migration as a blessing (EM 101; CSD 297). Wanderings, flight, exile, diaspora are founding biblical experiences. In the narratives about Abraham, the exodus from Egypt, and the Babylonian exile, migration is understood as an experience of God’s grace. From it arises an ethic that knows how to be responsible for the stranger. The life of Jesus is characterised by homelessness. The first Christians considered themselves “strangers” and “guests” on earth (Hbs 11.13; 1 Pt 2.11). Paul speaks of diverse people being unified in Christ (Gal 3.28; Col 3.10-11). Responsibility for strangers is a moral commandment that can become a place for encountering Christ (Mt 25).

     

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    "(...) among man’s personal rights we must include his right to enter a country in which he hopes to be able to provide more fittingly for himself and his dependents (...)". Pope John XXIII (Pacem in terris, 105-106)

     

     

    "Institutions in host countries must keep careful watch to prevent the spread of the temptation to exploit foreign labourers (...)". Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church (Chapter VI, 298)

     

    Lord, have mercy! Too often we are blinded by our comfortable lives, and refuse to see those dying at our doorstep. #Lampedusa

     

     

     

  • Mark Butaye o.p.

     

    Hospitality beyond conditions


    Christian social tradition is biblically founded on ‘brotherhood’ and its consequences of reciprocal responsibilities and recognition of human dignity, in any circumstance: “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground” (Gen. 4,9-10). As the encyclical Pacem in Terris has unequivocally stated: “Every person has the fundamental right to live in dignity” (PiT, 11). This recognition is unconditional and focuses most urgently where Gods creation has been wounded, neglected, discriminated or devastated in his people. His creation must be unconditionally healed.

     

    John Paul II has made it clear that human responsibility reaches even beyond brotherhood: « His irregular legal status cannot allow the migrant to lose his dignity, since he is endowed with inalienable rights, which can neither be violated nor ignored ». Reciprocity is also grounded in the fact that the church considers mankind as a pilgrim people, reminding us that we are temporarily users and not owners of the land we live in. She also reminds us not to forget in “better times” our common previous experience of being refugee in the past. In 1945, when more than 11 million “European” refugees were welcomed in neighbour countries, Pius XII urged to sustain and to structurally accompany helpless people, foreigners in their own continent.

     

    read more

     

     

     

    "(...) among man’s personal rights we must include his right to enter a country in which he hopes to be able to provide more fittingly for himself and his dependents (...)". Pope John XXIII (Pacem in terris, 105-106)

     

     

    "Institutions in host countries must keep careful watch to prevent the spread of the temptation to exploit foreign labourers (...)". Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church (Chapter VI, 298)

     

    Lord, have mercy! Too often we are blinded by our comfortable lives, and refuse to see those dying at our doorstep. #Lampedusa

     

     

     

  • Christian Mellon sj

     

    Welcoming the stranger


    When voting, a Christian cannot consider the question of asylum and immigration policies as being of secondary importance. This is a central element for the voter’s faith.

     

    On the subject of asylum and immigration, the principles proclaimed by the European Union are hardly different from those defended by Christians. What Christian organisations which defend the rights of migrants notice and deplore, is the fact that these principles are relativised in practice because of the priority given by politicians to the determination to limit the access of those outside the EU to the territory of the Union.

     

    This determination goes back to what Pope Francis condemns as a “culture of rejection”, which he invites us to convert into a “culture of encounter” because, for a disciple of Christ, welcoming the stranger goes beyond a simple moral or juridical requirement: it is a spiritual issue, since the Lord identified himself with the stranger (Mt 25,35). When Christians stand up against the “globalisation of indifference” dramatically illustrated by the tragedy of Lampedusa, this is because “there are pages in the Bible which we cannot tear out”, to use the expression of a French bishop during a public debate on these questions.

     

       read more

     

     

     

    "(...) among man’s personal rights we must include his right to enter a country in which he hopes to be able to provide more fittingly for himself and his dependents". Pope John XXIII (Pacem in terris, 105-106)

     

     

    "Institutions in host countries must keep careful watch to prevent the spread of the temptation to exploit foreign labourers (...)". Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church (Chapter VI, 298)

     

    Lord, have mercy! Too often we are blinded by our comfortable lives, and refuse to see those dying at our doorstep. #Lampedusa

     

     

     

     

let's make it happen:
CHRISTIAN ORGANISATIONS' PROPOSALS
MORE PROPOSALS

Jesuit Refugee Service

 

Rethink the reform proposals for the Common European Asylum System (CEAS)

Jesuit Refugee Service

 

Use alternatives to immigration detention first

Jesuit Refugee Service

 

Improve the living conditions in immigration detention

Jesuit Refugee Service

 L. Boldrini

Ensure a more dignified and humane European asylum system

Jesuit Refugee Service

 

Improve protection systems at EU entry points

Jesuit Refugee Service

 

Stop sending migrants back to countries where their lives would be in danger

Caritas Europa

 

Ensure adequate protection of migrants and asylum seekers at EU external borders

http://www.initiative-ixe.eu/